Reception Hub

Art

Blossoming Spring.

The plum blossom – like those in our school garden – is a symbol for resilience and perseverance in the face of adversity because plum blossoms often bloom most vibrantly even amidst the harsh winter snow. As the plum tree can usually grow for a long time, ancient trees are found throughout the world, and have long been popular in China and Japan in particular. This week, explore the exquisite drawing of artist Jin Nong. Dr Mulvenna demonstrates how you could experiment with mixed media to create your own beautiful plum blossom artwork – a sure hurrah for spring’s arrival!

Ready, Steady, Reception

Ready, Steady, Reception!

Your child’s first year at ‘big school’ is an exciting time. We’ve put together a list of our 5 top tips to help make the transition from home or nursery to Reception a little easier.

1. Talk! It might sound simple, but making time for back and forth conversations in your home language is one of the most beneficial things you can do to prepare your child for Reception. Helping them to be more confident sharing their thoughts and opinions, as well as listening to those of others, prepares them to make friends – something they will be doing lots of!

2. Self care. Does your child know how to go to the toilet on their own? Are they confident in how to wash their hands after? Can they take their jumper off on their own or put their coat on? These little acts of independence will help your child to grow in confidence and see themselves as school ready.

3. Get physical! As well as all the incredible benefits to our physical and mental health that outside play provides, did you know that mastering the monkey bars can help your child to write? Crawling, climbing, swinging and jumping help build the muscles your child needs to be a strong, confident writer. If you fancy an adventure a little further afield, we recommend Highgate Woods – it’s at the end of the Northern Line and has a wonderful adventure playground and huge woodland that is perfect for taking a picnic and playing all day!

4. Read! Sharing stories helps to spark a child’s curiosity for and understanding of the world around them. It builds their imagination, vocabulary, listening skills and knowledge of stories. Reading with your child every day helps them see the world from different points of view and to access the learning across the curriculum. It is essential!

5. Sing! A good repertoire or songs and rhymes not only sets the foundations for learning music, it also helps children to be better at reading and writing.

On their first day, your child will need:

⁃ labelled school uniform – including shoes (no laces please!)
⁃ a backpack
⁃ a labelled plastic/metal water bottle
⁃ spare school uniform (including socks and underwear)
⁃ their ‘All About Me ‘poster to decorate our classroom walls!

Why not watch these films of our Reception team reading some stories!

Here We Are

Going to School

Billy and the Big New School

My School Unicorn

Love